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Carpeting or Hardwood? The Debate is Settled Once and for All
When homeowners are remodeling their floors, the question of whether to install hardwood or carpet inevitably rises. There may be pros and cons to both but at the end of the day, there’s a clear winner: carpet. Here’s why.

Comfort

 

No matter what your age, there’s no beating carpet in terms of comfort and feel. If you’re:

  • A senior, a carpet can make the difference between a bruise and a break
  • A baby, carpeting makes learning to walk a much more forgiving process
  • A teen, playing loud music gets dampened with carpeted floors
  • A young adult or college student living at home, carpeting makes it easier to not wake up others when you get home late (or bring someone home)
  • Someone who gets cold easily, walking on carpets is warmer than hardwood floors and removes the need for slippers
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    Cost

     

    Hardwood can cost anywhere from three to 10 times more expensive to install than carpeting, and is a lot cheaper to repair than wet or warped wood (which may often has to be thrown away, if it’s not possible to save it). A square foot of carpet is only a few dollars, compared to $9 and up for hardwood.

    And as opposed to hardwood, which has to be nailed, glued or clicked into place, carpeting is pretty much just laid in place. It takes just about no time to install, doesn’t require a highly skilled specialist to carry out the work, and can be changed frequently and easily.

    Aesthetic


     

    While there’s no denying the elegance that a hardwood floor can bring, the look of it means homeowners have to really like it because they’re stuck with it for a while.

    Carpeting, on the other hand, can be changed every week or month to go along with the most current trends. And while it’s not exactly cheap to change carpeting on a weekly or monthly basis, it’s much less expensive than buying a new couch, wall unit, TV, or furniture set.

    Warmth

     

    We alluded to this point briefly in the first paragraph about how carpeting benefits those with cold feet, but there’s more to the thermal factor of carpeting than that.

    One of the main ways a house gets—and stays—warm is through insulation. Heating it gets it warm, obviously, but the trick is to keep it that way. Hardwood flooring isn’t exactly a great insulator, but carpeting is. It has a high thermal resistance rating, enabling homeowners to keep a comfortable temperature without turning to the thermostat (which ends up costing more money, anyway).

    There will always be homeowners who prefer hardwood flooring for factors like aesthetic and cleanability, but those who have transitioned over to carpets know they’ve got the better deal. It’s more forgiving on falls, helps keep the house at a more even temperature (and for less money, too), and is so easy to change, anyone can do it for mere dollars. Hardwood flooring? Not even in a carpet-favorer’s vocabulary.
    Amy Wright
    Christina
    Amy Wright is the Lead Editor of Remodeling Central. When she isn't playing with her dogs she is trying to remodel a classic Chicago style brownstone with her husband.